Living, Breathing "Products"?

[align=center][/align]

The job description for a booth babe sounds pretty harmless, doesn’t it? All you do basically is spend a couple of hours at a noisy convention, dressed in whatever little outfit is provided for you, walk around talking and showing off a product, and then crash in your room at night. Sounds simple enough. However, while the job itself my not be very depending, it certainly seems to push these girls to borders of awkwardness and uneasiness that the attendees may realize.

Sure, most of them are models. Sure, they know they’re pretty hot. Sure, they know men are going to ogle over them. Though does this give someone the right to be disrespectful towards a booth babe just because she’s showing some cleavage?

Gizmodo produced a short four minute documentary where they interviewed a few booth babes that worked the passing CES. The documentary takes a look at what it’s like to be in the heels on the floor. While some women are simply there because it was an easy modeling job to get, others are there due to actually liking technology and wanted the job as a way to see some new products. Others didn’t care and just happened to be pretty and got the job to make a quick buck. But despite their true intentions of being there, they all told stories of how some male attendees act towards them as they see them more as products than people.

It seems as if some men forget that these women are being paid to be looked at and lure them to a booth and instead, see them as being there for sex-for-hire. The stories are interesting; some even a bit disturbing.

[quote=“Kumiko”][align=center][/align]

The job description for a booth babe sounds pretty harmless, doesn’t it? All you do basically is spend a couple of hours at a noisy convention, dressed in whatever little outfit is provided for you, walk around talking and showing off a product, and then crash in your room at night. Sounds simple enough. However, while the job itself my not be very depending, it certainly seems to push these girls to borders of awkwardness and uneasiness that the attendees may realize.

Sure, most of them are models. Sure, they know they’re pretty hot. Sure, they know men are going to ogle over them. Though does this give someone the right to be disrespectful towards a booth babe just because she’s showing some cleavage?

Gizmodo produced a short four minute documentary where they interviewed a few booth babes that worked the passing CES. The documentary takes a look at what it’s like to be in the heels on the floor. While some women are simply there because it was an easy modeling job to get, others are there due to actually liking technology and wanted the job as a way to see some new products. Others didn’t care and just happened to be pretty and got the job to make a quick buck. But despite their true intentions of being there, they all told stories of how some male attendees act towards them as they see them more as products than people.

It seems as if some men forget that these women are being paid to be looked at and lure them to a booth and instead, see them as being there for sex-for-hire. The stories are interesting; some even a bit disturbing.[/quote]

That must suck but sadly their job is to attract men to the products and you’ll get the undesirable people to come also.

True, it is a job to attract men to the products. But that’s the thing… It’s too the product; not for sex like some attendees believe. There’s a fine line between harmless flirting and harassment. Regardless if it’s a job or not.

And that also goes not just for sexual harassment, but any form of harassment at all. As the article attached the video states, some men use the fact that these women are hired to be there as an excuse to touch them sexually. Just like how most people bitch at retail clerks and verbally harass them just because they know they can’t yell back without risking being fired.

Just because it’s a job doesn’t give someone the right to treat you like an unemotionally object.

[quote=“Kumiko”]True, it is a job to attract men to the products. But that’s the thing… It’s too the product; not for sex like some attendees believe. There’s a fine line between harmless flirting and harassment. Regardless if it’s a job or not.

And that also goes not just for sexual harassment, but any form of harassment at all. As the article attached the video states, some men use the fact that these women are hired to be there as an excuse to touch them sexually. Just like how most people bitch at retail clerks and verbally harass them just because they know they can’t yell back without risking being fired.

Just because it’s a job doesn’t give someone the right to treat you like an unemotionally object.[/quote]

While I agree with you I’m not sure what anyone could really do about it. Its the result of relying on physical attraction because whether they like it or not booth babes are used as eye candy. While I’m sure its a plus to know the product that’s not why booth babes are hired. While I was at anime expo an Atlus booth babe gave me a trama team band aid but I’d rather have talked with someone about the game or played a demo. I got much more out of playing Tatsunoko Vs Capcom.

Well yeah, there’s not too much that can be done at the floor level. However, some companies do try to protect their booth babes by fining people who harass them.

Personally… I couldn’t imagine being a booth babe. I have ran into enough awkward, creepy situations just living my life. I couldn’t imagine what it would be like exploding myself like that on a floor like that.

[quote=“Kumiko”]Well yeah, there’s not too much that can be done at the floor level. However, some companies do try to protect their booth babes by fining people who harass them.

Personally… I couldn’t imagine being a booth babe. I have ran into enough awkward, creepy situations just living my life. I couldn’t imagine what it would be like exploding myself like that on a floor like that.[/quote]

I personally would prefer there weren’t booth babes so I could just experience the product. One of the best way to sell me on a video game is to show me gameplay. The more a developer can talk about and show why their game is cool the more interested I can get.

By seeing a match of Tatsunoko Vs Capcom shows its a fighting game like the other Capcom Vs. Series featuring Tatusnoko characters this is much better than any both babe could be.

G4 had a special about them during last year’s comic-con or E3. I don’t remember. I do feel sorry for them. Standing around for 8 hours straight for 2- 3 days wearing tight skimpy clothing, talking to creepy people, and the hot atmosphere.

So Destructoid’s podcast, Podtoid, touched up on the booth babe article. (It starts at about an hour and sixteen minutes in the podcast.)

The guy who uploaded the article onto Destructoid’s web site mentions a conversation he had with the author from Gizmodo who was a woman. Apparently she had her ass grabbed a few times on the CES floor while doing interviews. Even though she wasn’t a booth babe and not dressed provocatively, she was still being touched by random men just for being a worker at the conversation.